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Were is menu setting for global link color?

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  • Were is menu setting for global link color?

    Can someone tell me where the 'global' setting is for links.

    This works fine in Dynamik Custom CSS:

    a, a:visited {
    color: #ab1840;

    }

    Where can I set this in DWB Design. It's gotta be somewhere but I can't find it!!

    Thanks.

    Al

  • #2
    Since there are lots of different kinds of links (including menus), there is no single global setting.

    Comment


    • #3
      I wanted to change all links on the site to the same color. I figured there was some global setting for links in DWB... perhaps in 'body' or 'content' but no such entry, which you have just confirmed. I was surprised this was not included in DWB but given the ease of inputting our own CSS it is not a big deal. I wish I had asked first instead of spending an hour looking!!

      Thanks, SIGa.

      Al

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      • #4
        Using the U-Control and Sync feature, you can change/sync your link colors in just a few seconds (video in the Docs).

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        • #5
          I've never understood how do use any of the major DWB tools... like the front-end designer. I'm comfortable writing my own CSS and PHP (if necessary). To me DWB is for creating page layouts with EZ or via hooks, etc. Our less technical people are able to make style changes without knowing CSS. I've been tempted to try one of the many page builders out there... like Beaver or Elementor or Divi, but these just add a lot of code to the mix (bloat) and I don't have the trust in any of them that I have with Eric and his programmers with respect to keeping his tools/themes updated to both WP and Genesis.

          Our team is 'married' to the Genesis Framework. We loved Catalyst but when Eric moved to Genesis we moved with him and have been very happy with the stability we have received with Gen. and DWB Our (client) sites might not be the most 'beautiful' or 'original looking' but they never, ever, crash. And anyone who is in the web design biz will tell you that trying to deal with a white-screen-of-death is a total time-sink that can ruin your profitability. Both DWB and Gen has spared us that nightmare!

          One day I'll figure out how to make DWB more productive for us... but we are old school and don't like to rely on lots of tooling to do things that we should learn how to do ourselves via PHP or CSS code (within limits, of course.) I trust Eric's code generators. I can't say the same for the page builders out there... and I don't know what kind of code gets generated by the advanced DWB tooling. (Where is the video for the front end thing?)

          DWB is a great product. I don't know why it is not more popular. I hope it stays popular enough so that Eric continues to support it. Seeing that the traffic on this board is way down from previous years makes me somewhat concerned people are 'replacing' DWB with the more advanced page-builders, but I don't know for sure. Maybe if Eric put out some press pieces or blogs that could show up on ManagedWP or Bolt or other WP community sites that more people would take a look at DWB.

          I think the expensive renewal cost is what holds a lot of people back. I know that we look very, very carefully at what tool family we want to 'marry' into.

          We have a lifetime license with Gen and DWB. If we didn't, I'm not sure we would be happy paying a $100 a year for updates that we probably don't need or don't want. It is getting to the point where some shops have a yearly renewal payment due every week... sometimes two... depending on how many software tools or services they use. We all have limited budgets and that makes us super careful about what we decide to adopt.

          I'd like to see a system where vendors promise to support their products for security updates and compatibility with WP for 4 years as part of the initial buy-in and offer added features on a paid yearly basis. But every software tool company wants that yearly renewal fee and they don't quite understand that there are only so many pieces of software or services that we (their customers) can afford to support.

          These days we are not able to 'date' software... we have the marry into the family! You can end up with a number of very expensive wives!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dev77 View Post
            I'd like to see a system where vendors promise to support their products for security updates and compatibility with WP for 4 years as part of the initial buy-in and offer added features on a paid yearly basis. But every software tool company wants that yearly renewal fee and they don't quite understand that there are only so many pieces of software or services that we (their customers) can afford to support.
            Dev77, Would you be willing to build as site, and offer 4 years of security and compatibility as part of the purchase price?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Sogwap View Post

              Dev77, Would you be willing to build as site, and offer 4 years of security and compatibility as part of the purchase price?
              Of course we do. We always have. If we do your site and you make no modifications beyond normal updates of plugins, WP, Genesis, and themes, AND if all of a sudden things don't work as usual, we want to know about and we will figure out how to fix it.

              But our paradigm is a bit different than other houses. First we have a deep 'bench' of technical expertise... in PHP, CSS, Javascript, etc. All of us are in our mid to late 60s and have had decades of experience in information technology... programmers, UI designers, back-end developers, etc. When you have been 'doing' computer stuff for thirty or forty years you learn a lot of 'stuff." But most importantly you learn how to learn! I would not be surprised if in staff-age we are the oldest web design firm on the planet!! We should call ourselves Geriatric Design! I'm 69, my "number one" is 67, my front-end graphic woman is now 66, and my (PHP) youngest person is 62.

              Second, I do a lot of training. I like to bring in some old guy or gal who is either semi-retired or who can't get a job because the "millennials" who do the hiring totally discriminate against older tech workers. I train folks in doing things 'our' way. (Believe me if you are in your 60s and get interviewed by some 30 year old, they do not want to hire their 'dad' or their 'mom'... or in my case their 'grandpa!') So the folks we hire or contract with are not only grateful for the opportunity to earn good money (we pay around $45/hr USD) they bring us good work-ethics, they are dependable, and are happy to learn new 'stuff.' (There is a huge reservoir of 'aged' talent out there that is untapped because of blatant discrimination or incorrect perceptions about older tech workers being 'out of date" or unteachable.)

              Third, we vet our tooling very, very thoroughly. We like our plugins and themes to have been around for several years, have thousands of users, and to be most often community supported (open source.) We also like to take open source code and modify it, often taking out code we think will one day fail. Of course we use some 'premium' themes and plugins, but ONLY if we can get a lifetime license for them. We are not going to get into a situation where we have one or two or three yearly license payments due every week of the year!

              Fourth, our sites are designed to sell (usually books) first and to have eye-candy second. Our philosophy is that "Less is More." I and my graphics person come from many, many years in the publishing business. (I own http://adams-blake.com and she owns http://bookwrights.com) We have a good background on what kind of written and visual content will sell as opposed to what just looks pretty and does nothing else. (There is actually some science behind all the smoke and mirrors! That is what age and experience brings us. As the Farmers Insurance commercial goes "We know a thing or two because we've seen a thing or two!")

              Finally, we offer large, expensive sites in WordPress (http://newmediawebsitedesign.com/wp2/) and much smaller, 'up in a day' sites in Bootstrap (http://newmediacreate.com/lim/). But neither platform would be considered 'cutting edge.' We're 'old' and experience has taught us that it is the pioneers who end up with the arrows in their backs!

              If we do your site and (1) if you do your part by keeping it updated (we teach you how!) and (2) you have not added any plugins or changed themes, then if it goes down (or sideways) we will fix it for free.

              It happens maybe twice a year, and most often because some host popped in a caching plugin which can screw things up 'bigly' but is easy-peasy to take out or disable.

              I hope this answers your question.




              Last edited by dev77; 04-07-2017, 03:12 AM.

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              • #8
                Dev 77,

                Thanks for the thoughtful reply.

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